Odd theories of evolution, part 4

Originally published at the normality factor. You can comment here or there.

Yesterday, I started talking about the mitzvot (also known as the 613 Commandments), and how they may just be the “care and feeding” guide for the snazzy new perfected genetic code that Adam and Eve got from some crazy celestial experimenters.

Of course, there are plenty of admonitions and rules and regulations in the mitzvot that I don’t abide and are not valid to the theory because they do fall into that moralistic realm.  Part of the whole upshot of this series of blogs is that morals are not exclusively just dictated by stuffy old men with long beards and small penises:  sometimes they have a purpose.  (And that’s not to say that some morals aren’t the prejudices of these same men, but let’s be a little intelligent about it and use the brain the aliens gave us.)

Let’s just pretend for a minute that this theory of Adam and Eve is valid.  For you, a human and distant descendant of the Original Couple – because we really are ALL related, without reservation – you have a genetic inheritance somewhere deep in your code that could enable you to live to 125 years old, at least.  This genetic inheritance does not make you a morally better person or somehow the master of your emotions and spiritual self.  If that were the case, Cain wouldn’t have committed his little faux pas.

Okay, so the morals were designed to be extraordinarily specific to keep people from abusing a pretty remarkable existence and to protect the gift of longevity that they were given.  I can see that.  The sexual restrictions may have been necessary both to be able to keep track of progeny as well as to reduce STDs – which were very much alive and well back then, I promise.  The idol worshiping thing… well, that’s a little over-flogging the deceased golden calf (I tried to count them and lost focus), but maybe if those idol-worshipers were eating bad food that was counter to the new genetics’ programming…

Part of this is fascinating to me because it completely validates the conduct elements of proscribed religious activity without the actual religion.  This is important because it takes away the necessity of religious prejudice, I’d think.  The Jews want to do it this way, and they are following these laws for the purpose of protecting this genetic inheritance, and that’s just fine.  It’s not just because “God said so”.  And if someone else wants to do it a different way, that’s fine – that’s another part of our wacky humanity, that “free will” thing – they can do it because it feels right to them, not just because “God said so”!  And if you choose to not go on any of those paths at all but do something completely different, that’s okay because it’s your choice – God doesn’t have to say so!

So, these celestial beings give us a huge leg-up in our evolution, and now thousands of years later, we may almost be mature enough to handle it.  What does one do with one’s time when you have the potential to live twice as long as you originally thought you would?  How does one go about restoring and then protecting that genetic potential?

Here’s what I find particularly beautiful about it:  IF one were so inclined, one could take this story the way I’ve presented it and find a better foundation for a belief in a higher power than through all the other religious implications from all the “holy” books in the world.  Plus, IF one were so inclined, they’d have a great foundation for an excellent diet and enjoy incredible health and well-being for a reeeeeeeally long time.

Yes, it’s a fascinating theory.

And now, for your part:  What would you do if you knew you were going to live for around 900 healthy years?  Caveat:  Your “child-bearing years” are only the ones that we currently have, between, say, 20 and 45.

Odd Theories of Evolution Part 1Part 2Part 3 – Part 4

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